AED 

About AED - Automated External Defibrillator

An Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is an electronic device that is used to deliver an electric shock to reset a patient’s heart when it has stopped beating normally.  It is critical that an AED is used as soon as possible, as the likelihood of a successful defibrillation diminishes significantly over time. Defibrillation survival rates increase to greater than 50% when early defibrillation occurs.  For each minute defibrillation is delayed, the patient’s change of survival decreases by about 10%.  

***AED’s are designed for use on adult victims, however most can be adapted to use with pediatric pads for victims who are children or infants

About AED
  • Analyzes the victim’s heart rhythm
  • Determines and advises when shock is needed
  • Delivers electrical shock to victim in cardiac arrest
  • Reestablishes a heart rhythm which will generate a pulse
AED Design 
  • On/Off Button
  • Cable and pads (electrodes)
  • Defibrillation capable
  • Voice prompts to guide defibrillation
  • Battery operated for mobile use
AED Use Overview
  • Place the unit between you and patient – by patient’s shoulder
  • Turn the unit on
  • Apply AED pads to bare chest and the cable to AED unit
  • Stand clear
    • Wait for unit to analyze the heart rhythm
  • Deliver shock, if needed
  • Perform CPR

AED - Automatic External Defibrillator

CPR must be started and continue until defibrillator (AED) becomes available.

If an AED becomes available

  • Remove patient from any standing water or metal surfaces
  • Dry chest if noticeably wet
  • Remove hair from chest enough for pads to make good skin contact
  • If victim has a transdermal medication patch, remove the patch and wipe the area clean prior to attaching pads
  • Use appropriate AED pads
Adult and Child AED Use
  • Place the AED by the patient’s shoulder
  • Turn on the AED and follow voice prompts
            Adult: use adult AED pads
    • AED pads should not touch
    • Place AED one pad directly below the clavicle on the right sternal boarder
    • Place the other AED pad lateral to the left nipple with the top of the pad a few inches below the axilla
    • If patient has a permanent pacemaker, or implanted defibrillator, place the AED pad at least 1 inch to the side of the implanted device
            Child: use pediatric (child) AED pads
    • AED pads should not touch
    • Place AED one pad directly below the clavicle on the right sternal boarder
    • Place the other AED pad lateral to the left nipple with the top of the pad a few inches below the axilla
     Infant: use pediatric (child) AED pads
    • AED pads should not touch
    • A manual defibrillator is preferred for infants less than 1 year of age. 
    • If a manual defibrillator is not available, an AED with a pediatric dose attenuator is suggested, if neither are available, an AED without a dose attenuator may be used. 
    • Smaller infant, the pediatric AED pads should be placed in the anterior-posterior position
  • Wait for AED to analyze the rhythm
  • If a shock is indicated
    • Do NOT touch the patient
    • Ensure no one else is touching the patient
    • Press the shock button
  • After shock is delivered
    • Keep pads on the patient
    • Complete 2 minutes of CPR cycle
    • Reassess the patient’s condition
    • Follow AED voice prompts
  • Continue following AED voice prompts, administering CPR cycle and AED shock until
    • The patient shows signs of life
    • A second rescuer or EMS takes over
    • You are too tired to continue     
  • If NO shock is indicated
    • Continue CPR cycle if the victim is unresponsive
    • Continue CPR until a second rescuer or EMS takes over or you are too tired to continue